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"Call Me Adam" chats with...

Entries in Music (135)

Wednesday
Aug282013

Jim McCarthy: Goldstar Interview

Jim McCarthy is the CEO of Goldstar, but he is also Customer Service Agent Number 1 for the company. Jim has spent the last decade and a half in e-commerce, starting way back at GeoCities before it was bought by Yahoo in 1999. Even before that, he helped to open about 50 Noah’s Bagels locations in California, where he learned about delighting customers, developing employees, and managing high growth. He’s written articles and commentary in Fast Company, Business Insider, and other well-known publications, and has appeared as a speaker at conferences like SXSW, TEDU (part of the main TED conference), INTIX and others. He co-founded TEDxBroadway, which he also hosts and curates. Jim graduated from Harvard College and has an MBA from the Anderson School at UCLA. He also speaks Japanese, writes ghost stories and is a certified lifeguard.

For more on Goldstar be sure to visit http://www.goldstar.com and follow them on Facebook and Twitter!

1. You are the CEO and one of the founders of Goldstar (along with Robert Graff and Richard Webster), the world's largest ticket booth, offering half-price tickets to various theatre, comedy, dance, concerts, sporting events, and other live entertainment outlets. What made you want to start Goldstar together? You know those conversations you have where you say "Someday, we'll..."? The three of us had been having those conversations about starting a business for a couple years, and 'someday' finally came.

Jim McCarthy with co-founders Robert Graff and Richard Webster2. What have you learned from working together? Trust in equal doses with candor. It's impossible to work with partners if you don't give them the leeway to run the part of the business they're responsible for, but at the same time, if you do that without an atmosphere of candor with each other, that doesn't work either. I imagine putting on those big puffy boxing gloves...I may hit (or get hit) pretty hard, but there's no intent to hurt. The intent is to be honest and get to the heart of a solution.

3. Why did you want to focus Goldstar on entertainment events rather than another area of interest? It's a perfect match for what the Internet/web/mobile technologies do well, which is taking a whole complicated mess of different things a person might be interested in and match them to millions of people, quickly and elegantly. Not just that, but there was and still is a basic breakdown in the world of live entertainment: people want to be at these events more and the events would love to have more people there! Our thought from the start was that's a problem that deserves a solution.

Not only that, but it's fun. You can make a fortune in cement, but it's pretty hard to get excited about it. Last week, on consecutive nights, I saw a baseball game, a rock opera, and a Broadway play. I suppose there's an amount of money I'd take to work in the cement industry instead of this, but it would have to be quite a bit more!

Summer night at the Hollywood Bowl, just one of the many venues Goldstar sells tickets to4. How do you decide which events you are going to sell tickets for? Our goal is to be broad, so we'd like to have a wide range of things in every city that we're in. We've done this for long enough that we can filter for shows and events that are professionally done and are going to be good experiences for our members, though to some degree we do let our members tell us what they think about an event.

In other words, if you're a pro or a talented amateur running an event, your show should be on Goldstar, so call us!

5. Goldstar is a membership driven service, with nearly 4 million members, many of your members being the average age of 37 years old and female. Did you start out trying to get this demographic or did they find you and now you cater to this age group? We paid attention early on to who was most responsive to what we had to offer and then went deeper into that audience as much as we could. It's important to say though that although our audience is 2/3rds women, we have a lot of men in the audience, and they're great members too. Goldstar is for everybody, really, though if you polled 100 women and 100 men, more of the women would respond more quickly.

We also saw that it was really important to many of the venues and shows that we worked with that they reach a different audience from the ones they are already reaching. That could be age, gender, or ethnicity based, or it could be a whole bunch of other things, but we saw that they didn’t need "help" selling discount tickets to the people they already had a strong connection to. What they needed more than anything was to reach a whole bunch of other people who have every reason to be interested in what they’re selling.

6. How do you feel Goldstar has helped inspire a younger generation to go to live events? We're about choices, information, and variety. We make going to live entertainment something that's easier to do, more social, and where you're better informed. I think there are a lot of unintentional barriers to getting out to live entertainment and arts, and we're breaking those down in ways that helps everyone get out there. This especially helps younger adults who generally come to this kind of content a bit later in life.

I also think that there’s a strong connection between making live entertainment part of your life and truly exploring your own personal creativity. People are creative in a million little ways in their work and just in their daily lives, but how much of the time is that creativity really activated? I think everyone, but perhaps young people in particular, want creativity of whatever kind to be part of not just what they do, but in fact who they are. I can’t think of an easier or more fun way to stir your own personal creativity than to see it on a stage as a regular habit. When you see a smart performance, you get a little smarter. When you hear someone funny, you get to be a little funnier. When you see an athlete do something amazing, you feel somehow that you too could strive to be more like them. I think we’re on the midst of a personal creativity explosion and going to live events has a big role to play in that.

7. Goldstar has been in business for over 10 years now. Did you imagine Goldstar would be what it is today when you first started out? What has been the best part about this venture so far and what challenges have you faced? Yes, actually! This is a lot like we imagined it, which means we've been tremendously fortunate. Being a bootstrapped company, the challenges mostly relate to patience. Many very high-powered fads have come and gone in the time we've been in business, and there's a kind of pressure to jump on board those fads, but if they don't make sense, you have to resist. That's tough.

The most fun part is seeing the impact of the business on all the people we touch, including Goldstar employees, the venue and show partners whose businesses we help build, and of course, the millions of people we send to all these great nights out. That's the best thing, really.

8. What do you see for Goldstar's future? In a few years, most people will think of us as the place they go to find something to do. This is already true for a lot of people, but we're uniquely positioned to take that to a mass level. We'll be able to provide people with a good answer to the question of how to figure out what they should do with their free Saturday night.

9. What event don't you sell tickets for that you would like to? Every event belongs on Goldstar, because we have the largest channel solely dedicated to live entertainment and arts in the country. If you want to reach that audience, you need to be there, so the show that I'd like to see on Goldstar is Call Me Adam, the Musical.

10. In addition to selling tickets, you also provide for those less fortunate through your Thanksgiving Appeal where members can provide a Thanksgiving meal to one of the local food banks in their area. How did you decide to start this program ? What has been the greatest reward knowing you are helping so many people? We started this program the second year we were in business because we realized the year before that the week of Thanksgiving is a pretty tough time to try to sell tickets.  We had, really, no money at the time, but what we did have was an audience whose attention we could command for a few minutes with our emails and our website. We thought it would be nice to use that for something, and Goldstar members have always been really responsive to the Thanksgiving Appeal.

It's all to their credit, really. I'm just happy we can facilitate it, but it's about the generosity of the Goldstar members, not about Goldstar. I'm always proud but not surprised at what our customers do for the organizations, and it's one of my favorite things that happens during the year.

Monday
Aug122013

Linda Eder: Provincetown Crown & Anchor Interview 2013

Adam Rothenberg and Linda Eder at Feinstein's in NYC 2010Showcasing one of the greatest contemporary voices of our time, Linda Eder’s diverse repertoire spans Broadway, standards, pop, country and jazz. 

I first interviewed Linda back in 2010 at Feinstein's in NYC (click here for that interview) when she was promoting her album "Soundtrack." Now, three years later, it's an honor to catch up with Linda in Provincetown, MA as she brings her incomparable voice to The Crown & Anchor's Paramount (247 Commercial Street) for two nights only, Monday, August 12 and Tuesday, August 13 at 8pm.

For more on Linda be sure to visit http://www.lindaeder.com and follow her on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube!

Linda Eder at "Now" PhotoshootLinda Eder and Frank Wildhorn, Photo Credit: Aubrey Reuben1. We first met in 2010 when you were performing at Feinstein's, in support of your album "Soundtrack." Since that time you released "Now" & continued to tour around the world.  On "Now,"  you collaborated with Frank Wildhorn once again. What do you like most about working together & singing his music? What do you connect to most with his music? Frank writes really pretty melodies with nice intervals that are fun to sing and seem to work really well with my voice and my style of singing. When he teams with a great lyricist like Jack Murphy or Nan Nighton it is pretty magical.

2. You are back out on tour again. One stop on your current tour is Provincetown, MA. What do you enjoy most about performing here? The audience is made up of mostly gay men and so it is always a wild fun night with lots of wonderful feedback from the crowd and that is what performers live for.

Linda Eder in the recording studio3. You will be performing at The Crown & Anchor on August 12 & 13. What do you feel this venue offers your show that another one might not? Location, location, location! Isn’t that what they always say? It’s on the water; it’s a small intimate room, always a great crowd.

4. What do you hope audiences come away with after seeing your show? I hope they had fun. I hope they laughed. Most of all I hope they are moved emotionally.

5. What is your favorite part about putting a show together? Putting shows together is work. It takes some thought to how the songs will flow so I have to sit quietly and concentrate. That’s why I usually procrastinate but I also know that I have a knack for putting set list together.

6. What is your favorite part about putting an album together? On a new CD my favorite part is singing the background vocals. It sounds funny but I love to harmonize. It’s also always so great to hear the new arrangements played down for the first time.

7. What singers inspire you today? So many it’s really hard to name them all. I listen to singers for different reasons. Some have incredible, gymnastic voices that I like to listen to for that reason but when it comes to enjoying music for the sake of music it isn’t always the singer with the biggest range of greatest vocal licks. It always comes down to the song. So these days I listen more for the songs and the mood or emotion it creates in me.

Linda Eder as "Lucy" in Frank Wildhorn's "Jekyll & Hyde" on Broadway8. Aside from singing, are there other aspects of entertainment you want to pursue? Any aspirations to come back to Broadway? I would like to get into acting a little bit. Maybe some TV. As for Broadway, I don’t have plans at the moment but I would actually like to do a play. I don’t know that I want to sing 8 shows a week anymore.

9. What's the best advice you've ever received? The secret to life is three things...

1. Someone to love

2. Something to do

3. Something to look forward to

10. If you could have any super power, which one would you choose? The power of flight! Absolutely!

More on Linda:

As the tragic character "Lucy" in the Broadway musical Jekyll & Hyde, from composer Frank Wildhorn, Linda blew the roof off of New York’s Plymouth Theatre each night as she belted out signature songs "Someone Like You" and "A New Life." Her Broadway debut, for which she was rewarded with a Drama Desk nomination, sent her already rapidly rising star blazing across the sky, securing her spot as one of America’s most beloved singers and dynamic live performers.

Most recently, Linda crowned her two-decade recording career with a new album, Now, which reunited Linda with Broadway and pop composer Frank Wildhorn. The new release marked the musical return of this legendary team after six years. Linda’s transcendent voice is the perfect complement to Wildhorn’s lush, imaginative music. Now’s 12 dynamic new tracks elevate the spirit while capturing many moods.

Born in Tucson, Arizona, and raised in Brainerd, Minnesota, Linda began her career singing in her home state and eventually landed a gig at Harrah’s Casino in Atlantic City. But it was her appearances on the 1987 season of Star Search, where she won for an unprecedented 12 weeks, that attracted the attention of audiences and record companies alike.

Linda launched her recording career in 1991 with her self-titled debut album and soon established a vital niche as America’s most popular and acclaimed new interpreter of pop standards and theatrical songs with 14 solo albums and 12 musical recordings. Those albums highlight Linda’s abundant vocal gifts as well as her skill for delivering dramatic, emotionally resonant interpretations of familiar songs while making them her own. She followed up with The Other Side of Me, a country pop blend of contemporary music – including a song written by Linda.

In Fall 2010, Linda released Soundtrack. Produced by Peter Collins, Soundtrack finds Linda going to the movies and adding new dimensions to an eclectic mix of themes from the silver screen. The 12 tracks span the last 50 years in cinema, from Henry Mancini’s "Charade," the title tune of the 1963 movie starring Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn, to "Falling Slowly," the Best Original Song Academy Award winner from the movie Once.

In June 2010, Linda and Clay Aiken covered Roy Orbison’s "Crying" as a duet on Clay’s album Tried & True. She was recently featured on two PBS television specials including Clay Aiken’s Tried & True and Hallelujah Broadway.

The concert stage remains the mainstay of Linda’s career. She has performed for sold-out crowds and venues across the country and throughout Europe. Her concerts have been televised on Bravo and PBS. Trail Mix, her primetime Animal Planet special, was a natural extension of her love of animals for this Minnesota native who remains a "farm girl" at heart.

Linda has performed at many prestigious venues such as Carnegie Hall, The Town Hall, The Kennedy Center, Davies Hall, Radio City Music Hall, Wolftrap and the Ravinia Festival. Always touring in good company, her collaborations include the late Oscar-winning composer and pianist Marvin Hamlisch, Tony-winner Michael Feinstein and Keith Lockhart, conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra.

Wednesday
Jul242013

Kitt Shapiro: Simply Eartha Interview

Photo Credit: Debra HazanKitt Shapiro and Eartha Kitt

Kitt Shapiro is the daughter of the one and only Eartha Kitt, who is keeping her mother's legacy alive through Simply Eartha, a home decor website featuring Eartha's image and famous sayings, known as "Kittisms" on various designs for your home all made from natural fabrics, recycled goods, and in America.

Kitt and I had the pleasure of speaking about her mother's legacy, why she started Simply Eartha, and what it was like being the daughter of the legendary entertainer!

For more on Simply Eartha be sure to visit http://www.simplyeartha.com and follow them on Facebook and Twitter! For more on Eartha Kitt check out http://www.earthakitt.com!

1. What was it like to grow up as the daughter of Eartha Kitt? I didn't have a lot to compare it to as far as being somebody else's daughter [laughs]. It was an amazing life. Hindsight is 20/20 and now that I'm 51 years old, I look back and think about what an unbelievable experience my life was. When I was very little, my mother was the most attentive parent. She was physically there. She always told me she loved me and she showed me love. She always included me in almost everything she did. She made sure I traveled with her because she felt travel was the best education I could ever get, much better than any textbook could ever give me. So when we traveled, she made sure I saw what the different countries we visited were really like. It wasn't from a tourist or fancy hotel perspective. She would make friends with the waiters, maids, and taxi cab drivers and made sure I got to stay in people's homes, real people's homes, not celebrity people. She made sure I learned the way of life was different in the country we were in. She showed me how different people lived. She wanted to make sure I knew that growing up in Beverly Hills, CA or London was not the way the rest of the world saw things.

Like all children, I certainly had my moments when I didn't want to leave the air conditioned hotel room or complained about going somewhere, but it never seemed to phase her because she knew in her gut, that the way she was showing me the world was far more important than giving into the little bit of complaining I was doing.

Eartha Kitt as "Catwoman" on TV's "Batman", Photo courtesy of Earthakitt.comEartha Kitt with Cher, Photo courtesy of Earthakitt.com2. What did you enjoy most about having a mother who was an international celebrity? What was frustrating about it? I don't think I equated the fact that she was as famous as she was. I don't think I understood that as a little girl. I did understand that she had to travel a lot. As I mentioned earlier, she took me with her most of the time, but there were times when she couldn't take me with her and that was always hard for me because I was so attached to her. 

I grew up going to a French school in Los Angeles and London and so I was around other children who's parents did special things, whether they were diplomats or celebrities, so they didn't have 9-5 parents. It didn't seem that my mother was doing anything different. She may have been famous, but the kids I was around also had unconventional parents, so I was in a world of unconventional people.

I don't think I really comprehended she was famous. Times were much different then. She could go out and be recognized, but people didn't really bother her. The one thing as a young girl that really, really bothered me was that I wanted to go to Disneyland with her. That was one thing she couldn't do, go to an amusement park. She was too famous to have a real experience at an amusement park.

3. You started the website, Simply Eartha after your mom passed away in 2008 from colon cancer. What made you want to honor your mother this way as opposed to writing a book or some other form? How did you decide on which home decor items you wanted to carry? Throughout my life my mother always said to me, "Don't throw anything away. Anything I've written or made, I've done for a reason." She would write down all these sayings, not that she necessarily made them up, but she coined them as "Kittisms." Once she wrote them down, you couldn't tell her she didn't make them up. She wrote ideas and thoughts all the time on little pieces of paper. Before she passed, she reminded me not to throw anything out. "Waste not, want not", she would say.

About a year after she passed, I went to pack up her house and found all of her writings, some of which I've seen before, but many I hadn't. So her words "Don't throw anything away" rang in my head and I wasn't exactly sure what I was going to do with this stuff, but my mother's assistant helped me put these sayings in notebooks and binders and we put them in storage. I had worked for my mother for the past 25 years before she passed, so I was very used to the way her business was operated. I ran Eartha Kitt Productions, producing her tours, albums, books, etc, and so for Christmas 2010, I put little books together with pictures of my mother and her "Kittisms" for a small group of people who meant a lot to my mother. I sent them out as Christmas gifts. Some of the "Kittisms" were my mother's handwriting and some I just did on my Mac. People would call me and say "Oh my goodness, these are so fabulous. What a great thing to do." Then I created the Simply Eartha Facebook Page (because that is what you do in this day and age) and I started posting these "Kittisms" and people would comment on them and ask for more. Then I thought, "Well, what do I do next." My mother always said, "You have to do something with what you have. You can't just let it sit there. You have to give back." Since she passed away from colon cancer, I thought I'll give back by donating the proceeds to the various colon cancer charities. My mother was very much into her home. She was all about her home and her garden.

From there, the site just evolved. What most people didn't know about her was that she was very simple. She would always say, "I'm just a little cotton picker from South Carolina." She truly believed in the earth, in recycling, in composting. She was green before it was chic. I used to call her "The Original Beverly Hillbilly." She had her own garden in Beverly Hills. We raised chickens, made our own eggs, and I was never allowed to eat anything processed. It just made sense to be all about her home life. We started with the line of home decor and now we are going to produce a line of journals and notebooks since my mother was always about writing down her thoughts, feelings, and ideas. It just made sense to stay true to who she was. She was all about "Made in America." I mean, if you gave her something "Made from China," forget about it, she would give it right back to you. When I started to manufacture these items, I made sure of a few things: it had to be green (made with natural material, or made from recycled products) and it had to made in the United States. If I make something from oversees, my mother is definitely coming back to haunt me. 

Me: It's nice that you are able to honor this way and teach people something about her life that, I don't think, many people would know on a regular basis. 

Kitt: With the internet today, people can find out almost anything public about someone, but a lot of people didn't realize just how incredibly profound and instinctive she was. She always listened to her gut and respected herself and always acted that way. People were always surprised at how tiny she was in person and I believe you met her? There was a picture you sent me?

Me: Yes, I met her after seeing her in Nine on Broadway.

Kitt: People would say that they thought she was so much bigger because of the way she carried herself. She carried herself with a sense of respect and elegance. That is something she always felt was being lost generation after generation. To be able to pass on who she truly was, not just her persona, I'm blessed to be able to do that. I was blessed to have a mother like her who was so connected to her environment, universe, etc, and really lived that way, up until her death. I always knew how much she loved me and she knew how much I loved her. I think that's the greatest gift a parent can give a child. I am truly blessed when she was alive and with her death of the memories she gave me and that I have as much closure one could possibly ever have when you lose a parent. 

My husband came in right before my mother died, I think she waited until I wasn't alone, and he called the hospice nurse who asked me if I wanted to clean her up and change her clothes. I said I did and I went into the bathroom to run the water, making sure it was warm, and the nurse came in and said, "I don't think she's going to care if the water is hot or cold." I looked at her and said, "You don't know my mother, if I put a cold washcloth on my mother, I don't care how dead she is, she's coming back and taking us both with her." Even then, my mother had given me that gift. She had only been dead 15-20 minutes and I was still able to laugh with her, even though she wasn't physically there. I just thought that was an amazing blessing. I'm also blessed to know that I was blessed. That's another reason why it's so great to be able to share these "Kittisms." You put something up that people respond to, puts a smile on my face. It's my mother's mark on this planet is still being left. That's pretty cool that I'm able to do that.

Eartha and Kitt, Photo courtesy of Earthakitt.com4. With your mother's passing, how did you find the strength to make it on and continue through? I'm not going to pretend it was easy. That first year I barely wanted to move in many ways. Everything that happened the first time was tough. That first Mother's Day was just awful. Everyday I pretty much shed a tear thinking of her and missing her. It is the way of the cycle of life. It is the way it's supposed to happen. Our parents are supposed to go before us and my mother had left this in my head. My mother really engrained in my head, "Don't throw anything away. Don't waste it. Don't let it sit there and do nothing." The more creative and the more into the process I've gotten, and it's been a learning curve because I've stepped into a business I knew nothing about, and my mother who was always happy that she was learning throughout her entire life, and so I look at it as the baton has been handed to me and it's my job to do something with it. I had no choice but to make this all work. To be able to take this energy she exuded and carry on the legacy is just the life path I'm supposed to be on.

Eartha and Kitt, photo courtesy of Earthakitt.com5. Now that it has been a few years since her passing, what do you miss most about her? I miss her talking to me and laughing at my jokes. My mother thought I was the greatest gift to the planet. She thought everything I did was wonderful. She always laughed with me and at me. I miss just sitting with her and laughing the most. I miss her voice too. She would always call me Kittala. I'm lucky I can hear her voice in recordings and movies and TV, but it's not the same just hearing her speak to me.

6. One of the things I enjoyed reading on Simply Eartha is how you mention things that your mother taught you to "be true to yourself, live honestly and with respect for everything and everybody. She also taught you to possess calm in a place of panic and to remember that humor is one of life's most precious gifts." How exactly did she teach you these lessons? Are there specific moments you remember learning each of these lessons? There were many times from big to small incidences that happened where my mother's sense of calm was tremendous. I wasn't and am still not that calm of a person, but I think I've become more so as I've gotten older. That ability to realize that panicking, worrying, getting upset in a situation doesn't change the situation. It only makes it more difficult to see what's happening clearly and to think more clearly. That's one thing my mother always told me, "Don't panic. God may not always be there when you want him, but he's always on time." So that ability to truly trust that every experience we have in life is designed to get us to the next place, even if it's not a place we want to be, we are supposed to be there. There is either a lesson we are supposed to learn or a gift we are supposed to give somebody else. We are not solely walking on this planet in solitude. We are all connected beings. 

Eartha and Kitt hangingWhen I was 13-years-old, my mother and I went to South Africa, during apartheid, in 1974. It was not very well received back home, my mother going into a country during apartheid. But my mother felt the way to truly make change is to go and make change. She felt artists were the true diplomats because they didn't have to follow protocol and political correctness. They could go and actually do something different. When we went to South Africa, she insisted on performing for inter-racial audiences, which of course people didn't do at that time, but she did. We traveled through the country for three months and we were raising money to build schools for the black African children and at one point we were in the town of Durban, South Africa, and there was this amusement park that I kept wanting my mother to come with me to (I had been going there everyday with my road tutor). One day, my mother was able to free up her schedule and come with us. We were in South Africa on VIP status so the rules of the country didn't pertain to us. We were on the bumper cars and all of a sudden the bumper cars came to a stop and one of the workers came over to my mother and said, "Excuse me, are you European?" and my mother said, "No, I'm American." The worker said, "No, no, that's not what I mean. Are you colored?" She looked at her skin and said, "I guess if you think this is colored then yeah, I'm colored." The worker said, "Well this is a white's only park and you are not allowed to be here. So my mother stood up and got out of the bumper cars and very calmly without saying anything started to walk out of the park. And I, in typical teenage fashion, start yelling and screaming and crying, "Tell him who you are. Tell him we are VIP and the rules don't apply, we can go anywhere you want." I remember my mother turning to me and raising her hand and saying, "Don't panic. Everything happens for a reason." We left the park and I cried for the rest of the day, very upset, not understanding why she didn't say anything or stand-up for herself. Well, a few days later, she was having a press conference and the photographers wanted her to take a picture. They asked her to do it on this balcony with the amusement park in the background. She said, "You know it's very funny, I was thrown out of that amusement park the other day." The press went crazy, "Eartha Kitt thrown out of amusement park." The owner of the amusement park found out and was embarrassed and called my mother and said, "I'm so sorry. The gentleman didn't understand. He had no idea who you were. How can I make it up to you?" My mother said to him, "You know we are raising money to build schools, so your donation, a big fat check would be very appreciative. And also my daughter loves the amusement park and she would love to come with some friends." So he sends over a check and sends over some tickets and we go back to the amusement park a few days later and my mother brings two white children, two colored children and two black children. At the time did I understand what she was doing, not necessarily, but I think back on it, that is how she made change. Her ability to stay calm and reacting her way was much more impactful than my way of wanting to make a scene. So, it's those lessons that my mother lived is how she taught me. That is truly how she lived her life.

My mother's given name was Eartha and she truly was "of the Earth." I do believe that there is a lot to be said for when you are really connected to this life source or energy. When you are truly connected to it, you function differently. I really believe that.

7. What have you learned about yourself from creating Simply Eartha and honoring your mother's legacy? I've learned that I'm more capable than I've given myself credit for and that I'm more creative than I thought I was. My mother would also introduce us as "I'm Eartha and she's Kitt." That's a lot to be brought up with, carrying your parent's name. When it's a famous parent, it's even more difficult. I wouldn't say it was a burden, there's a weightiness to it. I think I was blessed to be able to work for my mother, so we were together for our entire lives, but I was also the behind-the-scenes person, you know, I wasn't out on stage with her, so that's why I didn't think of myself as being creative. I've also learned that I'm able to have more faith and belief in what I'm doing. In staying true to myself and my mother, I possess more of a sense of calm than I ever did before and knowing that I am the vessel to carry on the legacy.

8. What future plans do you have for "Simply Eartha"? We're taking over the world [laughs]. We are going to bring even more design items for the home. We are also going to compile a book with all the "Kittisms," some in her writing and some not, similar to the books I gave her friends back in 2010.

9. Do you have other projects in the works to honor your mother's legacy? She has so many writings from parts of her life that were very impactful, such as The Civil Rights Movement, The Vietnam War, meeting Albert Einstein or Winston Churchill. She's another person in history, and I'm not sure a lot of young people know what she did. She wasn't Rosa Parks, but yet she made change in her own subtle ways. Similar to Rosa Parks she did it in a quieter way. I think that is a lesson to remind people. I would love to do a something like a traveling museum to schools. My mother was very connected to children who weren't as privileged and blessed. When she was alive, she had an organization called "Kittsvile" in Watts, in Los Angeles and on the weekend she would go there and teach dance. She taught the kids more than dance. She really taught them how to carry yourself. When you walk into a room a certain way, you give an impression to the people already there and feel differently about yourself. If you feel pride and respect for yourself and carry yourself that way than people are going to treat you that way because you are not giving them the option. That is what she would instill in these young people. She would also teach them to follow your own gut and treat yourself well. That means you take care of yourself. You look presentable. You speak to other people in a respectful way. She was very big on manners and you better give respect to your elders. She didn't care if she knew you or not, she was going to tell you what she thought. She felt you don't call them by their first name and you don't look down when they are talking to you. You shake hands, you look and act respectable around them. I really want this traveling museum to remind people that there was another person who made a difference. I think it's important to remind the next generation of this.

Eartha and KittKitt Shapiro and her family10. As a mother yourself, what traditions from growing up have you incorporated with your family? Once a year, we do a vacation with just the kids (no friends, no outsiders). We go to one place, we all stay together (it's not a beach or resort), and talk and play games. My kids role their eyes sometimes, but I think they'll look back on it later and be happy.

Me: I will say, of the vacations I went on with just my parents and brother, you do remember those times together and it makes a difference. 

Kitt: With all the success of Simply Eartha, my kids are learning something about their grandmother that they didn't know, which is very cool. 

Me: One of my friend's came over for 4th of July and he was talking about his parents and where they came from and my mom mentioned something about my grandfather, that I didn't know. It was nice to hear that fact and learn more about his life, especially since he's not around anymore. 

Kitt: I think we all want to be connected and being connected to family (whether it's the one you are born into, the one you grow up with, or the one you fall in love with) is really, really important. I see more of my friends staying close to their parents and grandparents and having their children do the same. I was an only child and when my parents divorced when I was very young, my mother made sure I stayed close with my father's family. So, I did have aunts and uncles and grandparents. It's just very important to honor your family, whether they are famous or not. My mother would always say, "Everybody's a teacher at some point in their lives and we are all here for a reason to give each other care, love, and fuel for the next generation."

Eartha and Kitt in 2008Kitt and Eartha in the October 2000 edition of Good Housekeeping, Photo courtesy of Kitt Shapiro Facebook Page 11. Your mother represented so many different things to different people. What do you remember most about her? Looking back, I realize how much she accomplished from being one little person with no family. She had the ability to move keep moving forward at times when she must have felt terrified. There is a survival instinct in just persevering, whether you do that on a private level or public. That's been a really important thing to look back and remember and admire her for. That could not have been easy. She didn't have any parental skills. She was an orphan. She was physically and emotionally abused. She lived at poverty level, but through it all she still had the ability to move forward. I saw that in her when she died. The hospice nurse said to me a few weeks before she died, "What's going to end up happening is that she is just going to stop drinking water and eating and just slowly fade away." My mother did ANYTHING but that. My mother left this world literally screaming at the top of her lungs. Of course I wasn't prepared for that. Two days before she died, she lost her ability to speak, but at her death she started screaming, and as a typical daughter I was screaming back at her, "You can go, you can go." My husband is standing in the corner having no idea what to do. She's screaming, and I knew she could hear me because the tears were streaming down her face, I'm crying, I'm telling her she can go, but what I saw at that moment, was how she survived her entire life. It was her survival instinct that took over at every point in her life, even then, at that moment, when there was no survival happening, she was not going to go easily without a fight. That is an amazing instinct that she never lost. It just shows what a truly amazing woman she was and that there was a reason for her to be on this planet.

Eartha Kitt Singing, Photo courtesy of Earthakitt.com12. What do you hope people remember most about her? One of the things I love about Facebook is that people can comment about their memories about my mother. They write about how my mother made them feel when they actually met her. People always had a positive impression of meeting her. When people met her, she really came across as who she was. People who didn't get to actually meet her, talk about how they were impacted by her whether it was by something she said or an interview they saw or just from her voice. It's a pretty neat thing to see how one person can have an effect on many people they come in contact with.

Me: I felt so fortunate when I got to see her in Nine, which was terrific.

Kitt: I loved her in Nine.

Adam Rothenberg and Eartha Kitt in 2003 after seeing her in "Nine" on BroadwayMe: Then to get to meet her afterwards was a real moment for me. I grew up watching her on Batman and then in my twenties I got to learn about her music and it was just wonderful have all those different facets of her life and now to get talk to you and learn even more about her and her legacy is so wonderful to me. I'm so appreciative of your time.

Kitt: You are very welcome. I love hearing how people were affected by meeting her. It just reaffirms my position in that I'm meant to carry the torch forward that she started. That is a really important thing and we all make our differences in the areas of the world we function in. We all have our outlets and we touch other people with them, as you do with Call Me Adam.

Me: I understand exactly what you are saying. It is always wonderful to meet my fans and hear that they have taken time out of their day, when there are millions of blogs to read, that they chose to read Call Me Adam, is just very cool.

More on Kitt:

Kitt Shapiro, only child of Eartha Kitt, introduces a lifestyle brand of coasters, plates, wall art, mugs, pillows, throws, and paperweights featuring the witticisms and images of her iconic late mother.

Upon her mother's passing from colon cancer in 2008, Shapiro discovered hundreds of whimsical thoughts scribbled on papers that they had referred to as "Kittisms"; Eartha said to her daughter, "When I'm gone, do not throw anything away – use it." So with part of the proceeds benefiting The Colon Cancer Alliance, Shapiro has preserved her mother’s legacy by weaving "Kittisms" such as "What I do today is how I am interpreted tomorrow," and "When life becomes confused, step aside and think" into this unique and collectible line of Simply Eartha home goods.

Simply Eartha also follows the entertainment icon’s strong feelings that Americans should be making products in America. These are all created in the Southeast, primarily Alabama. Being eco-friendly, and green-minded was also at the core of Eartha Kitt’s philosophy, and Simply Eartha’s products keep her passion for the environment alive.

Shapiro says "My mother was organic way before it was chic. She had a vegetable garden that she tended to, and a yard with chickens and roosters in Beverly Hills. She would be very happy with how these products are made. The coasters are natural tumbled stone. The plates are made from recycled glass. The throws are created from recycled T-shirts, and the dyes are all non-V.O.C. (non-toxic)."

Thursday
Jun132013

Danielle Grabianowski: Duplex and Night of A Thousand Judys Interview

Danielle Grabianowski is an award-winning singing actress whose performances have been likened to "Barbra Streisand at the Bon Soir and Bette Midler at the Continental Baths."  This June, she is making two very special appearances.

On June 17, Danielle will be performing in the third annual Night of A Thousand Judys benefit, hosted by The Meeting's Justin Sayre (Merkin Concert Hall at the Kaufman Center, 129 West 67th Street). Night of A Thousand Judys will donate all proceeds to the Ali Forney Center which is the nation's largest and most comprehensive organization dedicated to homeless LGBT youth. Joining Danielle in this extraordinary evening are original "Weather Girl" Martha Wash, three-time Tony Award nominee Carolee Carmello, Glee's Telly Leung, Justin Vivian Bond, Lea DeLaria, Christiane Noll, Tituss Burgess, Karen Mason, and many others. Click here for tickets!

Then, on June 19 (and August 28), at 7pm, Danielle will grace the stage of NYC's historic Duplex Cabaret Theatre at in the West Village for an evening of eclectic, impromptu set of standards, stories and pop tunes. Click here for tickets!

For more on Danielle be sure to visit http://daniellegrabianowski.wordpress.com!

1. Who or what inspired you to become a performer? My family moved to Florida in the middle of 6th grade and I had come from a really small school and had trouble making new friends in my new school. I was really shy. In 8th grade, I was picked to do a short solo at our chorus concert. The song was "Voices that Care." The teacher was Ms. Jury, we're Facebook friends now. Figuring out I could sing made the future look a little brighter.

2. Who haven't you worked with that you would like to? I'd like to continue working with my pianist, Nate Buccieri forever, he is amazing. And, I worked with a band at Sleep No More, but I've never worked with a band on my own show. I would love to collaborate on arrangements with a bunch of musicians in that way. I'm hoping to do that later on as our monthly gig at the Duplex gets underway.

3. What excites you about your upcoming cabaret show at The Duplex on June 19? Just that I don't know what's going to happen! It's a little more impromptu than other shows I've done, we're making it a monthly thing, so we're switching things up a little bit every time, so I find the unpredictability of all of that pretty exciting.

4. What do you like about performing at The Duplex as opposed to other venues around the city? THE STAFF!!! They just have a great way of making performers feel really welcome.

5. On June 17, you are taking part in the third annual Night of A Thousand Judys, benefiting the Ali Forney Center. What made you want to be part of this evening? How does it feel to know you are helping so many GLBT Youth? It's just a great thing. I've sung at The Meeting a couple of times and being a part of any evening where Justin Sayre is at the mic is bound to be a blast. Beyond that, I was actually pretty familiar with the Ali Forney Center through my efforts in social work. Someone came to speak about homelessness in the LGBT population in one of my classes and I really came to understand what a huge issue it is. I think living in Manhattan, especially if you're not gay, it can seem like being gay is totally easy, but a lot of these kids are coming from cultures and school settings a lot different than what we accept as the norm at places like the duplex or in the theater district. They are made to feel unsafe in their schools, they're ostracized by their families, and what's most startling is the rates of suicide that we're seeing. That tells you something about the predicament these kids and young adults are in - if the trend among this population is that life is so hard at 18 that the only way you can make it better is to attempt suicide, then clearly we really need to rally and give them the support they need. It's an important issue, it doesn't get nearly enough attention and I hope we make a lot of money!

Danielle Grabianowski at the 24th Annual Mac Awards, Photo by Joseph Marzullo/WENN.COM6. You are the recipient of the 2010 MAC Award for Outstanding Female Vocalist and the Bistro's Ira Eaker Special Achievement Award given to a "Star on the Rise." What do these honors mean to you? It was a great feeling to be recognized. The cabaret community in NYC is such a warm and fascinating group of people - I love being a part of that.

7. You took two years off from performing to go back to school to get a master's degree in Social Work. What made you want to pursue a degree? Do you feel this experience enriched your performing at all? My desire to do social work is totally related to my experience as an artist. When I was going through all the struggles as a performer, there were a lot of people who helped me: my acting teacher, my Alexander Technique teacher, my therapist. Mostly they helped me grow and change, which is what I needed to do. Most of the time, it's really hard to change on your own. No matter how much you want to change, a time will probably come when you don't think you can do it and you give up on yourself. It's a natural part of the process for a lot of us, which is why we need people around believing in us when we don't believe in ourselves and fighting for us when we lack the strength to fight on our own. On a very simple level, that is what social workers do. I wanted to give back to people what had been given to me. I'm still at the beginning of things but at some point I plan on working with other performers on all of this stuff. Social Work School has really shifted the way I see the world and other people and I'm guessing that will come across as I get back into performing.

8. What have you learned about yourself from being a performer? When I first moved to the city, so much of my confidence was wrapped up in my identity as a singer and when I didn't have success the first few years, my self-esteem took a huge hit. It was really bad, at the worst point, I couldn't even sing without crying. On some level, I thought that singing was the best thing about me and if no one found it valuable, I didn't know what to do with myself. Eventually I had to learn that there was more to me and more to life than performing. So I actually learned the most about myself through the rejection, which I think is the case for a lot of artists. Ironically, when I stopped grasping at the need to be successful, something more natural and innate took over that people really responded to.

9. What's the best advice you've ever received? It's so simple, but when I was auditioning for musicals and making myself miserable, I knew I had to make a change, but I'd been doing it for so long, the idea of simply making the 'right choice' about what to do next seemed impossible. My husband said to me, "it doesn't matter what you do, it just matters that you do something." And it's true. Soon after that responded to a Playbill add for an internship for Miller Wright & Associates. They specialize in PR for Jazz and Cabaret artists. While I didn't become a PR maven, I was exposed to amazing performances that I would have never had the chance to see and I also learned how to promote other people's shows which made it much easier when it came time to promote my own. I eventually got a job there and was surrounded by cabaret all the time and I think that played a huge role in all the great things that have happened to me cabaret-wise. And it all started by a small step of responding to an internship add.

10. If you could have any super power, which one would you choose? Time travel!!!!

 

More on Danielle:

Danielle Grabianowski won the 2010 MAC Award for Outstanding Female Debut, the Bistro’s Ira Eaker Special Achievement Award given to a “Star on the Rise” and the first-ever 1930s Idol competition. She was last seen as the jazz singer "Josephine Grant" in the award-winning Off-Broadway sensation, Sleep No More. Danielle took a two-year hiatus from performing to pursue a master’s degree in Social Work from New York University and has performed with various theater companies around the country including the Georgia Shakespeare Festival, Bakerloo Theatre Project and Bigfork Summer Playhouse as well as in various readings and workshops of new musicals and plays in New York City. Some of her favorites include "Thea" in Fiorello!, "the Porter" in Macbeth, "Fiona" in Brigadoon and "Angelique" in The Imaginary Invalid

Tuesday
Jun112013

Schuyler Iona Press: What I'm Failing to Learn Interview

Fourteen-year-old rising singer/songwriter/actress Schuyler Iona Press has captivated those of all ages with her deceptively simple melodies and introspective lyrics. She is now entertaining audiences every Wednesday and Saturday at Off-Broadway's 13th Street Rep in NYC (50 West 13th Street) with her new musical experience What I'm Failing To Learn through June 15th only! Click here for tickets!

For more on Schuyler be sure to visit http://schuylerionapress.com and follow her on YouTube!

1. Who or what inspired you to become a singer/songwriter/actress? I don't recall a specific moment when I decided that I wanted to be a singer, a songwriter or an actress. I have always been inspired by music, of many kinds. I fell in love with the music of Janis Joplin and Judy Garland when I was very little and tried to sing every one of their songs. Over the years I have found more and more musicians and writers who inspire me in many ways. In fact, I feel like I am constantly being inspired by someone. Last year I discovered Tracy Chapman and Rush. I love Sting and Eric Clapton. Joni Mitchell and Paul Simon and Bob Marley. And then I am inspired by people who are not actually musicians or actors themselves but just fascinate me. People I meet who make me laugh or cry and people I don’t know but who I wonder about because I catch a glimpse of their lives. I can't think of one particular actor or actress who inspired me although I love many. I'm inspired more by interesting people I see in real life I think. I guess my inspiration is a work in progress.

2. Who are you hoping to work with in your career? I guess I'm hoping to actually work in my career.  That would be nice. I haven't really thought about this. I love actors who bring humor to their characters, even really tragic characters. I really love Julie Delpi, I'd like to work with her. And her dad too! I'd like to be on a stage with Paul Simon. That would be crazy and amazing.

Schuyler Iona Press in "What I'm Failing To Learn", Photo Credit: Darren Press3. What made you want to create What I'm Failing To Learn? While I am really passionate about writing music and I love concerts, I also love theater. My mom and I talked about combining the two and creating a theatrical world where my songs could exist as part of something bigger. It was a challenge we made for ourselves and seemed like a lot of fun. It was also a chance to collaborate with my mom who wrote the video pieces. I had worked with my mom on a film that she wrote and co-directed called Theresa Is A Mother. I was an actress in that film. But this was different because we were really collaborating on the whole creative process.

4. What do you hope audiences come away with after seeing the show? I hope audiences are surprised and entertained and I really hope they feel they saw something that inspired them to talk or think about things in a new way. I guess I hope they come away feeling they had a lot of fun and that the music and characters made them feel things.

5. At 14 years old, what is like to gain the success you have thus far? How do you handle it all? I haven’t thought of any of this in terms of success, just doing the work that makes me feel good. I work very hard and I love writing and making music. I also love acting and collaborating with other people as a musician and an actress. So, it doesn’t feel like much to handle in that sense. I do put a lot of pressure on myself to do good work because it means so much to me, but that’s good pressure not bad pressure.

6. What is your favorite part of the creative process in writing a song? That’s tough because every song has its own creative process. Sometimes I write words first, sometimes a melody comes to me first. I think the best part is when suddenly a melody finds words or the other way around and I see it come together, that’s pretty exciting for me.

Schuyler Iona Press at The Bitter End, Photo Credit: Darren Press7. What does it mean to be the youngest artist to play NYC's famous The Bitter End? I don’t know what that means actually. It feels really good to share my music in a place like the Bitter End because of its history. I definitely loved thinking about and feeling all the amazing artists that have played on that same stage for so many years while I was playing there. To me being the youngest doesn’t mean much, but being a part of something bigger, like the history of an iconic folk and rock club, does mean a lot to me.

8. What have you learned about yourself from being a singer/songwriter/actress? I think the thing I’ve learned about myself that makes me the happiest is that my ideas and the music that I create can actually speak to other people and I can make connections with many, many people through it. That’s really important to me because in my private life I am very shy and I never found it that easy to make lots of friends in school and things like that. 

Schyler Iona Press in "What I'm Failing To Learn", Photo Credit: Darren Press9. What's the best advice you've received so far? That being "weird" because you are being honest and true to who you are is a perfectly good option in life. Look at people in the eye when they are talking to you, that’s important. And don’t always try to win an argument, especially with a three year old or a religious fanatic on the subway.

10. If you could have any super power, which one would you choose? Just one? I want a lot of super powers. I thought once that I would like the power to read people’s minds, but I think that would actually be terrible. I definitely want to fly. Super hearing would be good because eavesdropping is one of my favorite hobbies. I’d like the power to make people doing mean things to other people suddenly "get it" and stop.  That would be a good power. And if I have super powers I want a really good costume to go with them. Maybe with go-go boots.

 

Schulyer Iona Press, Photo Credit: Darren PressMore on Schuyler:

Schuyler is a 14 year old singer/songwriter from NYC now living in the Hudson Valley. She is the youngest artist ever invited to participate in the prestigious Singer/Songwriter Sessions at NYC’s iconic Bitter End. The music video to Schuyler’s 911 tribute song "Playground Museum" which is a first hand account of Schuyler’s experiences at 3 years old and includes a combination of home video of Schuyler shot on 9/11/01 and 9/11/12, had its premiere at the International Film Festival Manhattan and is a winner of the prestigious My HERO International Film Festival Music Video category in Los Angeles. "Playground Museum" is also a 2012 finalist for the Ron Kovic Peace Prize.

At 13 years old, Schuyler wrote the score and main theme song "Summer Child" for the 2012 indie feature film Theresa is a Mother winner of Best Film awards at the Orlando Film Festival, Washington DC Reel Independent Film Extravaganza, and International Film Festival Manhattan. Schuyler also co-stars in the film and was nominated for a 2012 RIFE Best Supporting Actress Award.

Schuyler has opened for singer/songwriter Ellis Paul and performed in many 2012 summer music festivals including Black Potatoe, Block Island, Utica Music, Boston GreenFEST and more. She was featured in the 2012 Spring issue of Avalon Magazine with photos by rock photographer Rebekah Blu.

Schuyler is a prolific song writer and is constantly adding to her large catalog of original songs. She wrote and recorded her first single, "I Am Today" at age 10, 100% of her proceeds from "I Am Today" go to pediatric cancer research. A poet at heart, Schuyler is inspired by life around her and continues to develop in front of audiences as a writer, guitarist, and humanitarian.